Laurie Metcalf

Founder, CEO, and Board Chair, Metcalf & Associates

11:00 AM - pANEL

Lori Beer

​JP Morgan Chase & Co
Global Chief Information Officer


THESE SIGNATURE KEYNOTES WILL PREPARE YOU FOR THE BRIGHT FUTURE AHEAD!

Mike Sayre

President, COO & Organizational Transformation Practice Lead
Metcalf & Associates, Inc.


Jennifer  Drake Fine-Gold

Iteration Manager - Senior The Gap

 Jamie Erbes


Director, Partner Programs, Cloud Support, Google Cloud

Marie Hicks

​Author & Professor

Illinois Institute of Tech

Ray Kurzweil, Google engineer and Co-Founder of Singularity University, predicts "Technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense ‘intuitive linear’ view. So we won’t experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century—it will be more like 20,000 years of progress." The global economy, geopolitics, regulatory environments, your customer’s needs, and your competitor’s offerings are also evolving faster than ever! How do you lead to keep up, let alone move ahead of your competition? Global leadership experts have identified the developmental stages of leaders, what determines how fast leadership development occurs, and the leadership competencies required for change at the speed of light! Do you have them?

How Sexism Destroyed the British Computing Industry (and Why We Should Care)

It feels like there are never enough hours in the day to be a mom and grow your career. You can! shape your future. 7 years ago I transformed from a singularly focused career woman to a work and family life juggler. It wasn’t easy after my daughter was born and it still isn’t. However, I have learned valuable lessons and techniques to be successful in both my home life and work life In this session I’ll share the 4 most important lessons I’ve learned . These key skills will make you better at work and home, helping you manage through any change, no matter if small or transformational. The future is coming – will you be able to adapt and thrive in yours?

Kristina Robinson

VP Software Engineering
Cardinal Health

Kathy Gibson

Chief Innovation

Officer, CAS

1:00 pm - Afternoon Keynote

Workplace equality is more than just a matter of ethics and equal pay, it’s also a way of defending against skills shortages and promotes creative ideas and solutions. While we’ve certainly seen increased gender equality in the workplace, obstacles to closing the gender gap persist, especially in STEM fields. How will you break through, and help women in your organization do the same? 

In this panel discussion, three inspiring IT leaders share how they identified new ways to break through systemic and situational barriers, what resources they used, and how they are carrying progress forward in their careers, and in their organizations. The panelists will discuss their “ah-ha!” moments that led to real change, and share practical guidance for ongoing success, including:

  • How to start, and maintain, strong mentoring relationships
  • Convincing others to embrace and build diverse teams
  • Leading cultural and behavioral change​ 


Take their experiences and apply them to your career and workplace. Together, we can continue to increase equality, and provide a healthier work environment for all. 

 Stephanie Shaw


Vice President - Enterprise Solutions & Analytics at The Wendy's Company

The first female Global Technology CIO in one of the largest financial institutions, Lori Beer is proving that not only should women have a seat at the top table but with hard work and determination, the sky’s the limit. Lori will share insights into her own personal journey, how she continues to navigate in a male-dominated industry, the importance of being customer-obsessed and what she is doing to drive and support a culture of not just diversity but inclusion – its #AllMindsWanted.  The session will touch upon:

  • Keeping up with the speed of change business and technology
  • How to build and sustain inclusive cultures, a wake-up call for managers at all levels
  • Expanding the definition of diversity and embracing talent beyond the technology stereotypes
  • Why managers need to think about the future; the importance of preparing and supporting talent

Leigh Helsel 

Vice President Retail Strategies at ICC

We have all heard, perhaps even experienced, the concept that true innovation really only exists within start-ups rather than established organizations.  Big or established companies are just too weighed down by their own success, too committed to existing processes and entrenched business models. In other words, “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.”

In this interactive session, we will explore how a sustainable innovation capability can be built and thrive in an established organization.  We’ll tackle some of the barriers that can derail internal innovation as well as demonstrate how to leverage those existing assets, resources, and scale to fuel innovation.  

9:30 AM - MORNING Feature

Being successful in work and family…experiences from one working mom

9:45 aM - Morning Feature

BLAZING A TRAIL FOR WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY

Leadership at the Speed of Light - 2050

Lori Pearson


Executive Director - OCLC

Learn from HER success: How to create a gender revolution where you work  

8:30 AM - mORNING Keynote

3:45 pm - Afternoon Feature

keynotes & featured speakers

Historically, who gets to do certain high-prestige work in high tech fields is contingent on gender, race, class, nationality, and many other categories. This talk looks at the example of early computing, in the nation that invented the computer, to explain how the gendered labor contours of the field developed, and how the field went from feminized to male-identified. As managers began to understand computing's power to shape the political landscape, gendered rules and regulations became more entrenched. But as this gendered change was taking shape, the British computer industry was simultaneously taking a nosedive, and the two changes were closely related. This talk shows how history can help us make sense of the present and the future by focusing not just on stories of technological progress, but also by being tuned into what we can learn from stories of technological failure.